post

The Real Key to Influence


 

51ay1tLmaHL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_

There are many books dentists can read to get better at presentation.  Most of the books can be found in the Sales and Marketing section of your local bookstore.  It seems that over the years I have read most of them.  Add to those the numerous books on philosophy and psychology and I could write my own book.  Hmm…I already have.

But in all seriousness, one book that was recommended to me years ago by Dr. Peter Dawson was S.P.I.N. Selling by Neil Rackham.

Great book…lots of practical information, but like so many books it falls short on specific advice for my day to day experiences with patients.

Let me give you an example.

S.P.I.N. is a process or series of questions that guides your patient interview.  It starts with Situation questions, Problem questions, Implication questions and finally Need payoff questions.

Essentially it is a guide to uncover the patient’s real problems and for you to fit that problem with your solution (payoff).

The real crux of Rackham’s system comes with finding the right implications.  In other words—what’s the real meaning behind the problem?

This is what most sales trainers call the WIIFM part of the presentation…the benefit.  And this is what they used to call in the Bronx…what separates the men from the boys.

The very best have a way of drilling down to uncover the real problems and their emotional implications.  Most of us have heard the sales saying, “People buy on emotion and justify on logic.”

Well the very best understand that and always think in terms of implications.

For example, I had a patient who resisted getting her front tooth fixed until her husband refused to go out in public with her anymore.  Fix the tooth for health reasons?  For functional reasons?  For comfort and appearance?

No way.

But when the idea of not being accepted came up…she was in my office in a New York minute (second reference to the Big Apple).

Yes sitting high up on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs is that need to belong.

It is their own particular circumstances and their own story that we need to explore in order to find what moves them.  That is why I advocate a complete examination that focuses on knowing our patients.

As a coach I hear stories like these all the time…specific incidents where the dentist says: “What do you say when they don’t see the problem, or when they tell you this objection or that.”

I tell them there are no words…just a mindset which includes lots of empathy and thinking about emotional implications.

Think in terms of implications — be preventive, so your patients don’t leave with regrets—“I could have had a V-8.”

 In the comments below—leave some specific situations where thinking in the language of emotional implication has helped you or created frustration.

In my next blog post I will give you an example of “selling ideas” rather than dentistry that just might improve your relationship with your laboratory.

                                                                         SPECIAL OFFER  

My new book, Art of Case Presentation will be available shortly.  Those who have signed up for the ADL Newsletter will be the first to know and will receive a 25% discount.

Art of Case Presentation: Learn when the new book is ready!

Find out when the new book, Art of Case Presentation, is ready - and get a special offer for 25% off!


So if you haven’t already signed up—go ahead and click that button.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta